Contact Us

To sign up to our quarterly newsletter please subscribe here

Hidden Vale Nature Refuge

 

The Hidden Vale Nature Refuge (formerly known as Old Hiddenvale) was established by The Turner Family Foundation in January 2007 and comprises 3,091 hectares of a 4,000 hectare working cattle station.

The Nature Refuge is located in the Little Liverpool Range (part of the Great Dividing Range) between Franklin Vale Creek and Mulgowie Valley. The range borders the local government areas of Ipswich City Council and Lockyer Valley Regional Council, with Western Creek flowing through its centre.

The land is mostly covered with open eucalypt forest and is largely mountainous, with basalt benches with black soil creek flats. Its vegetation has been identified as a regionally significant corridor which connects to the Little Liverpool Range and extends to Main Range National Park. The Nature Refuge provides suitable habitat for rare and threatened species including the glossy black-cockatoo, the square-tailed kite, and koala.

The area is protected in perpetuity through a Conservation Agreement between the Turner Family Foundation and the Queensland Government. This agreement binds any future owners, and those with an interest in the land, to conserve the area’s significant natural and cultural resources and provide for the controlled use of the land’s natural resources for livestock production, eco-tourism and adventure activities.

 

Centuries before white explorers first carved routes west, north and south of the young Moreton Bay penal settlement, the Yuggera Ugarapul people inhabited the region roughly from Ipswich to Maroon and westward to the Dividing Range. Nomadic like their neighbouring cousins, the Githabul people to the south and the Wakka to the west. The Yuggera Ugarapul were a distinct social unit "owning their homeland and governing themselves". They lived, hunted and fished until the coming of the white man.

Spicers Peak Nature Refuge

Spicers Peak Nature Refuge was established in 2006 and comprises 2000 ha of a 3000 ha working cattle station. It has seven kilometres of boundary with the Main Range National Park. This has meant that this area of significant conservation value is protected in perpetuity through a Conservation Agreement. This agreement binds all future owners and those with an interest in the land to conserve the area’s significant natural and cultural resources, and provide for the controlled use of the land’s natural resources for livestock production, eco-tourism and adventure activities.